Location

Rolla, MO

Session Start Date

6-11-1999

Session End Date

6-17-1999

Keywords and Phrases

Cab; Dust Control; Mobile Equipment; Quartz; Respirable Dust; Environmental Cab

Abstract

The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) has conducted a study to evaluate the effectiveness of cabs for controlling silica dust exposure during operation of mobile mining equipment. This study focused on bulldozers, front -end loaders and haul trucks, was conducted at surface coal mining operations and underground metal and nonmetal mining operations. Each piece of equipment tested was equipped with a cab. The vehicles sampled were from a range of manufacturers having different types of filter media and air intake configurations. The purpose of this study was to determine the reduction of dust and silica exposure that could be achieved through the use of a well-maintained cab. For each piece of equipment, dust and silica concentrations inside and outside the cab were determined and compared. In some cases, filtration efficiencies could be calculated. A properly designed environmental cab is sealed, has an intake air filtration system, and a heating and cooling system. Cabs should have good seals around the doors and windows. Factors such as cab pressurization filtration systems, filter media, and maintenance practices were also examined. In some cases, dust and silica reduction of 90 to 95% were observed.

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Appears In

U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Meeting Name

8th U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-11-1999

Document Version

Final Version

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 11th, 12:00 AM Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

Effectiveness of Cabs for Dust and Silica Control on Mobile Mining Equipment

Rolla, MO

The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) has conducted a study to evaluate the effectiveness of cabs for controlling silica dust exposure during operation of mobile mining equipment. This study focused on bulldozers, front -end loaders and haul trucks, was conducted at surface coal mining operations and underground metal and nonmetal mining operations. Each piece of equipment tested was equipped with a cab. The vehicles sampled were from a range of manufacturers having different types of filter media and air intake configurations. The purpose of this study was to determine the reduction of dust and silica exposure that could be achieved through the use of a well-maintained cab. For each piece of equipment, dust and silica concentrations inside and outside the cab were determined and compared. In some cases, filtration efficiencies could be calculated. A properly designed environmental cab is sealed, has an intake air filtration system, and a heating and cooling system. Cabs should have good seals around the doors and windows. Factors such as cab pressurization filtration systems, filter media, and maintenance practices were also examined. In some cases, dust and silica reduction of 90 to 95% were observed.