Location

Rolla, MO

Session Start Date

6-11-1999

Session End Date

6-17-1999

Keywords and Phrases

Self-Contained Self Rescuer; Oxygen Consumption and Prediction; Heart Rate; Useable Oxygen; Mine Emergency

Abstract

In view of the recent mine disasters in the Australian coal mines, there has been a need to develop strategies to introduce SCSRs into coal mines to replace the approved filter self rescuers. A study was undertaken to evaluate the performances of the units in the normal Australian underground coal mine conditions. The study involved a laboratory and field trials at four underground coal mines using a total of 37 volunteers. These volunteers walked along the escape route at their respective mines on the first day carrying the SCSRs on their belts. The walk was repeated on a second day with the same subjects donning the SCSRs. The dynamic heart rates of each volunteer were monitored and statistically analysed. The results of the study showed that the oxygen "run out" time of SCSRs could be predicted using the body weight, average heart rate and exercise rating of the subjects. The speed of travel, intensity of work and the individual habits (smoking, drinking, etc.) also influence oxygen consumption.

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Appears In

U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Meeting Name

8th U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-11-1999

Document Version

Final Version

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Jun 11th, 12:00 AM Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

Deployment of Self-Contained Self Rescuers in Australian Coal Mines

Rolla, MO

In view of the recent mine disasters in the Australian coal mines, there has been a need to develop strategies to introduce SCSRs into coal mines to replace the approved filter self rescuers. A study was undertaken to evaluate the performances of the units in the normal Australian underground coal mine conditions. The study involved a laboratory and field trials at four underground coal mines using a total of 37 volunteers. These volunteers walked along the escape route at their respective mines on the first day carrying the SCSRs on their belts. The walk was repeated on a second day with the same subjects donning the SCSRs. The dynamic heart rates of each volunteer were monitored and statistically analysed. The results of the study showed that the oxygen "run out" time of SCSRs could be predicted using the body weight, average heart rate and exercise rating of the subjects. The speed of travel, intensity of work and the individual habits (smoking, drinking, etc.) also influence oxygen consumption.