Location

Rolla, MO

Session Start Date

6-11-1999

Session End Date

6-17-1999

Keywords and Phrases

Mine ventilation; ventilation surveys; tracer gas; ventilation network simulation; ventilation design; diesel exhaust exposure; blast clearance; GHG emissions; natural ventilation

Abstract

This paper shows how the Nanisivik mine was able to improve the underground working environment, decrease operational costs, and reduce its impact on the environment through optimizing their ventilation system. Through re-organizing their ventilation system, the overall flow through the mine increased by at least 20%, and local flows increased by over 100%. This change also resulted in a 45% reduction of fan motor power. And as a consequence of reduced power demands the mine has decreased its Green-house gas (GHG) emissions. Currently, ventilation is typically responsible for 40% of a Canadian mine's underground electrical consumption. This could dramatically change as the relationship between air supplied by fans and the power consumed is a cubic. Nanisivik is just one example of how the Canadian mining industry is striving to remain competitive under the general pressures to supply more or better quality ventilation for the workforce but on the other hand reduce power consumption.

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Appears In

U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Meeting Name

8th U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-11-1999

Document Version

Final Version

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Jun 11th, 12:00 AM Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

Ventilation Optimization — Balancing the Need for More Power Against Environmental Concerns

Rolla, MO

This paper shows how the Nanisivik mine was able to improve the underground working environment, decrease operational costs, and reduce its impact on the environment through optimizing their ventilation system. Through re-organizing their ventilation system, the overall flow through the mine increased by at least 20%, and local flows increased by over 100%. This change also resulted in a 45% reduction of fan motor power. And as a consequence of reduced power demands the mine has decreased its Green-house gas (GHG) emissions. Currently, ventilation is typically responsible for 40% of a Canadian mine's underground electrical consumption. This could dramatically change as the relationship between air supplied by fans and the power consumed is a cubic. Nanisivik is just one example of how the Canadian mining industry is striving to remain competitive under the general pressures to supply more or better quality ventilation for the workforce but on the other hand reduce power consumption.