Location

Rolla, MO

Session Start Date

6-11-1999

Session End Date

6-17-1999

Keywords and Phrases

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD); Scale Model; Pressure Measurements; Auxiliary Ventilation

Abstract

This paper reports the interim findings of a research program whose objective is to determine whether Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models can be employed to accurately predict the airflow patterns within rapid development headings. In particular, the project aims to investigate the optimum set back distances for the ducts in order to adequately ventilate the face of the drivage. To validate the accuracy of the CFD model simulations measurements were obtained from a series of experiments performed on both scale models and within a full-scale surface gallery. The experimental scale-modeling program included making a series of pressure measurements across the face of the model for equivalent forcing duct setback distances of 5, 10 and 15 m (16, 33 and 50 ft). This pressure data was then plotted as contour plots and compared with the corresponding CFD predictions. A series of full-scale auxiliary ventilation trials were performed within a modified surface gallery. Three-dimensional velocity measurements were taken across a number of cross-sections using an ultrasonic anemometer. Velocity measurements were obtained for three forcing duct setback distances and for a typical force-exhaust overlap configuration.

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Appears In

U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Meeting Name

8th U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-11-1999

Document Version

Final Version

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Jun 11th, 12:00 AM Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

Validation of Computational Models of Auxiliary Ventilation Systems with Experimental Data

Rolla, MO

This paper reports the interim findings of a research program whose objective is to determine whether Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models can be employed to accurately predict the airflow patterns within rapid development headings. In particular, the project aims to investigate the optimum set back distances for the ducts in order to adequately ventilate the face of the drivage. To validate the accuracy of the CFD model simulations measurements were obtained from a series of experiments performed on both scale models and within a full-scale surface gallery. The experimental scale-modeling program included making a series of pressure measurements across the face of the model for equivalent forcing duct setback distances of 5, 10 and 15 m (16, 33 and 50 ft). This pressure data was then plotted as contour plots and compared with the corresponding CFD predictions. A series of full-scale auxiliary ventilation trials were performed within a modified surface gallery. Three-dimensional velocity measurements were taken across a number of cross-sections using an ultrasonic anemometer. Velocity measurements were obtained for three forcing duct setback distances and for a typical force-exhaust overlap configuration.