Location

Rolla, MO

Session Start Date

6-11-1999

Session End Date

6-17-1999

Keywords and Phrases

Mine Cooling; Exergy Analysis; Cooling Strategies; Energy Efficiency

Abstract

The extraction of minerals and coal at increasing depth, employing higher-powered, mechanized machinery to increase production levels imposes an increased burden on the ability to maintain an acceptable mine climate. Any deterioration in the mine climate within working zones may adversely affect the health and safety of the workforce. The combination of the optimal design of the mine system layout, together with the selective application of suitable ventilation and cooling systems, may be used to control the climate within working zones. The adoption of mechanical cooling within mines is an expensive process in terms of both capital and operating costs. Therefore, as mechanized mining takes place at increased depth, the need to maintain or improve the mine climate becomes more expensive. Consequently, to decrease overhead costs, reduce energy consumption and meet current and future environmental obligations, it is essential to provide the mine operator with a method with which to determine the most cost effective and efficient mine cooling system. To perform this analysis it is necessary to have a good understanding of the energy balances governing both the operation and utilization of a cooling system. This paper introduces the application of a novel approach to energy analysis of mine cooling systems, with a combination of the concepts of exergy and composite curves. These methods are used extensively throughout chemical and process industries to increase energy efficiency and reduce capital and operating costs. An outline of the methods employed in the application of these techniques to the energy analysis of a mining cooling system is presented.

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Appears In

U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Meeting Name

8th U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-11-1999

Document Version

Final Version

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 11th, 12:00 AM Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

Novel Approach to the Energy Analysis of Mine Cooling Strategies

Rolla, MO

The extraction of minerals and coal at increasing depth, employing higher-powered, mechanized machinery to increase production levels imposes an increased burden on the ability to maintain an acceptable mine climate. Any deterioration in the mine climate within working zones may adversely affect the health and safety of the workforce. The combination of the optimal design of the mine system layout, together with the selective application of suitable ventilation and cooling systems, may be used to control the climate within working zones. The adoption of mechanical cooling within mines is an expensive process in terms of both capital and operating costs. Therefore, as mechanized mining takes place at increased depth, the need to maintain or improve the mine climate becomes more expensive. Consequently, to decrease overhead costs, reduce energy consumption and meet current and future environmental obligations, it is essential to provide the mine operator with a method with which to determine the most cost effective and efficient mine cooling system. To perform this analysis it is necessary to have a good understanding of the energy balances governing both the operation and utilization of a cooling system. This paper introduces the application of a novel approach to energy analysis of mine cooling systems, with a combination of the concepts of exergy and composite curves. These methods are used extensively throughout chemical and process industries to increase energy efficiency and reduce capital and operating costs. An outline of the methods employed in the application of these techniques to the energy analysis of a mining cooling system is presented.