Location

Rolla, MO

Session Start Date

6-11-1999

Session End Date

6-17-1999

Keywords and Phrases

Ventilation Design; Ventilation Automation; Ventilation Control; Pollutant Monitoring; Airflow Monitoring

Abstract

Common to many established mines in Canada, is the problem that their ventilation systems are continually being stretched to meet new needs that were not anticipated in the original design. This can be the result of a variety of different factors, such as the discovery of new reserves at depth, accelerated production, new worker exposure regulations or a change of mining method. At Bousquet, the ventilation of a new multilevel mining block over 1 km away from the existing bottom of the mine presents a challenge. The airflow available for this region is limited to 57 m3/s by the size of a ventilation drift and raise, and by the total volume the mine can supply. This volume is sufficient only if it can be directed to the desired locations, namely where the diesel equipment is operating and with minimal losses (<10%). Due to the mobile nature of the mining equipment and changing production areas, such tight management of air can only be achieved with "Ventilation on Demand". This paper describes a pilot trial, within the existing mine, of an automated demand based ventilation management system. Vehicle tracking and identification determine ventilation demand, location and duration. Specific air volumes are achieved with remote controlled regulators, and auxiliary fan systems and verified with airflow monitors. Air quality is monitored with gas sensors. Based upon this trial the mine will be able to determine the viability of an air quality driven system over an engine based air quantity dictated system. This would then, with the approval of the local regulators, allow the mine to operate its ventilation more efficiently and gain the maximum benefit of cleanengine technology and exhaust treatment devices.

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Appears In

U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Meeting Name

8th U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1999

Document Version

Final Version

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Jun 11th, 12:00 AM Jun 17th, 12:00 AM

Ventilation-on-Demand: Quantity or Quality — A Pilot Trial at Barrick Gold's Bousquet Mine

Rolla, MO

Common to many established mines in Canada, is the problem that their ventilation systems are continually being stretched to meet new needs that were not anticipated in the original design. This can be the result of a variety of different factors, such as the discovery of new reserves at depth, accelerated production, new worker exposure regulations or a change of mining method. At Bousquet, the ventilation of a new multilevel mining block over 1 km away from the existing bottom of the mine presents a challenge. The airflow available for this region is limited to 57 m3/s by the size of a ventilation drift and raise, and by the total volume the mine can supply. This volume is sufficient only if it can be directed to the desired locations, namely where the diesel equipment is operating and with minimal losses (<10%). Due to the mobile nature of the mining equipment and changing production areas, such tight management of air can only be achieved with "Ventilation on Demand". This paper describes a pilot trial, within the existing mine, of an automated demand based ventilation management system. Vehicle tracking and identification determine ventilation demand, location and duration. Specific air volumes are achieved with remote controlled regulators, and auxiliary fan systems and verified with airflow monitors. Air quality is monitored with gas sensors. Based upon this trial the mine will be able to determine the viability of an air quality driven system over an engine based air quantity dictated system. This would then, with the approval of the local regulators, allow the mine to operate its ventilation more efficiently and gain the maximum benefit of cleanengine technology and exhaust treatment devices.