Abstract

"In many cases the explosions which kill so many shot firers can be directly attributed to the presence of gas, or coal dust, but often there will be explosions of terrific violence in mines which are so wet as to preclude the possibility of dust being held in suspension in the air current, and where no gas has been detected in the history of the mine. Such an instance came under the writer's observation some time ago in which his opportunities of investigation were excellent, and the results of which may perhaps throw light on other apparently mysterious explosions of similar character. It is the purpose of this paper to go over this particular incident in detail, as being the most representative case of the kind which has come within the writer's experience, and as an especially careful investigation was made in view of anticipated legal action, and the matter being further investigated by the officials of the State Mining Board of Illinois"--Introduction, pages 3-4.

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Degree Name

Professional Degree in Mining Engineering

Publisher

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy

Publication Date

1910

Pagination

ii, 28 pages, 3 plates

Geographic Coverage

United States

Rights

© 1910 G. E. Lyman, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Coal mine accidents
Coal mine accidents -- Case studies
Detonators -- United States -- Safety measures

Thesis Number

T 228

Print OCLC #

5932880

Electronic OCLC #

858281406

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