Masters Theses

Keywords and Phrases

Metal Matrix Nanocomposites; Nanoparticle-enabled Diffusion Control; Nanoparticle Strengthened Interfaces

Abstract

"Nanoparticle-enabled diffusion control has been shown to rapidly refine multiphase microstructures during slowly cooled casting. This thesis characterizes the diffusion and the mechanical properties of nanoparticle-enabled diffusion controlled materials. To characterize diffusion properties, in situ characterization is performed to verify the nanoparticle enabled diffusion control mechanism. Materials with nanoparticles were observed to decrease the diffusion coefficient by at least one order of magnitude under similar melting conditions as compared to materials without nanoparticles. To understand mechanical properties, the nanoparticles that assembled at the growing interface were characterized under mechanical tensile stress. Nanoparticle-enabled interfaces were observed to improve the interface bond between dissimilar materials, providing a method for improving the interface strength without altering the original material system. Based on these findings, nanoparticle-enabled diffusion control is shown to be a viable method for improving microstructural design and mechanical properties of multiphase materials"--Abstract, page iv.

Advisor(s)

Chen, Lianyi

Committee Member(s)

Wojnar, Charles
Liou, Frank W.

Department(s)

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Mechanical Engineering

Sponsor(s)

National Science Foundation (U.S.)

Comments

Financial support of National Science Foundation (U.S.) 1562543

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

Fall 2017

Journal article titles appearing in thesis/dissertation

  • In-situ observation of nanoparticle-enabled diffusion control by high-speed synchrotron x-ray imaging
  • Interfacial strengthening of nanoparticle-enabled interfaces

Pagination

ix, 33 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographic references.

Rights

© 2017 Joseph Louis Volpe, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Thesis Number

T 11244

Electronic OCLC #

1021857563

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