Masters Theses

Keywords and Phrases

HVDC; M-HVDC; Multi-terminal-HVDC; VSC

Abstract

"Improving the efficiency and operation of power transmission is important due to the continual increase in demand for electric power. In addition, many remote areas throughout the world lack sufficient access to electricity. Unfortunately, utilities cannot satisfy the high demand of power by building new power stations because of economic and environmental reasons. However, utilities can increase generation and transmission line efficiencies by controlling the power flow through their systems. One new attractive technology that enables the control of power flow in the system is Voltage-Source-Converter High Voltage Direct Current (VSC-HVDC) transmission.

Multi-terminal-HVDC (M-HVDC) can be built using VSC technology. A model of a three-terminal VSC-HVDC system is presented in this thesis. One of the converters is used to regulate the DC voltage while the others converters control the active power independently and bi-directionally. The vector control strategy and pulse width modulation (PWM) technique are described and implemented in PSCAD/EMTDC. In addition, the region of controllability as a function of power flow has been analyzed. Furthermore, the steady-state and dynamic response characteristics as a function of capacitor size has been investigated"--Abstract, page iii.

Advisor(s)

Crow, Mariesa

Committee Member(s)

Kimball, Jonathan W.
Ferdowsi, Mehdi

Department(s)

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Electrical Engineering

Sponsor(s)

Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission to the United States

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

Fall 2014

Pagination

ix, 49 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographic references (pages 47-48).

Rights

© 2014 Mohammed Mabrook Alharbi, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Electric power transmission -- Direct current
Electronic apparatus and appliances -- Power supply -- Direct current
Electric power systems -- Mathematical models

Thesis Number

T 10573

Electronic OCLC #

902729958

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