Masters Theses

Keywords and Phrases

Charge Pump; Cockcroft-Walton; Power supply

Abstract

"Switched capacitor (SC) converters are becoming quite popular for use in DC-DC power conversion. The concept of equivalent resistance in SC converters is frequently used to determine the conduction losses due to the load current. A variety of methodologies have been presented in the literature to predict the equivalent resistance in hard-switched SC converters. However, a majority of the methods described are difficult to apply to general SC converter topologies. Additionally, previous works have not considered all nonidealities in their analysis, such as switching losses or stray inductances. This work presents a generalized and easy to use model to determine the equivalent resistance of any high-order SC converter. The presented concepts are combined to derive a complete loss model for SC converters.

The challenges of implementing output voltage regulation are addressed as well. A current-fed SC topology is presented in this work that overcomes the problems associated with voltage regulation. The new topology opens up a variety of additional operating modes, such as power sharing. These additional operating modes are explored as well.

The presented concepts are verified using digital simulation tools and prototype converters."--Abstract, page iii.

Advisor(s)

Kimball, Jonathan W.

Committee Member(s)

Ferdowsi, Mehdi
Shi, Yiyu

Department(s)

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Electrical Engineering

Sponsor(s)

National Science Foundation (U.S.)

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

Spring 2014

Pagination

ix, 93 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 85-92).

Rights

© 2014 Lukas Konstantin Müller, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

DC-to-DC converters
Switched capacitor circuits
Power electronics
Electric power systems -- Mathematical models

Thesis Number

T 10464

Electronic OCLC #

882486055

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