Masters Theses

Abstract

"A cyber physical system (CPS) has two main subsystems; a physical infrastructure that is responsible for managing and implementing physical tasks, e.g., generation and distribution of a physical commodity, and a cyber infrastructure that is used to support and enhance these physical operations through computing, communication, and control. Imperfect cyber control can lower the efficacy and even reliability of existing physical infrastructures. As such, justifiable reliance on CPSs requires rigorous investigation of the effect of incorporating cyber infrastructure on functional and non-functional aspects of system performance. One non-functional metric of note is resilience, defined as the ability of a system to "bounce back" from a disrupted state to what is considered as an acceptable performance.

This dissertation proposes a deterministic and non-deterministic model for resilience of networked CPSs. The model is illustrated through application to a nine-bus power grid. Multiple disruptive events are considered, and associated figures of merit are defined, with the overall objective of representing system-level resilience as a function of component restoration time - assumed to be both deterministic and non-deterministic. The proposed technique can also be used to rank components based on their impact on system resilience. The model is validated through discrete event simulation."--Abstract, page iii.

Advisor(s)

Sedigh, Sahra

Committee Member(s)

Hurson, A. R.
Choi, Minsu

Department(s)

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Electrical Engineering

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

Spring 2014

Pagination

ix, 46 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 44-45).

Rights

© 2014 Kamlesh Ashok Joshi, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Cyber intelligence (Computer security) -- Testing
Intelligent control systems -- Design
Intelligent agents (Computer software)
Computer network architectures

Thesis Number

T 10454

Electronic OCLC #

882479132

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