Masters Theses

Abstract

"The objective of this study is the evaluation of a mechanical system, which includes a Hooke's joint, as a possible torsional vibration actuator. The essential requirement of such a system is to produce a periodically varying angular motion superimposed upon a mean constant speed rotation. The basic kinematics of a Hooke's joint suggest that it could be used to generate the type of motion desired. The mechanical arrangement of a system incorporating a Hooke's joint is described and the governing differential equations are developed. These equations are simultaneous, differential equations of second order and are highly nonlinear. Values of typical system parameters are selected and the equations are solved numerically using a fourth order Runge-Kutta digital solution. The equations are solved with variations of constants to evaluate the effect of change in parameters upon the system response. The numerical results show that the vibration amplitude at the specimen is directly proportional to the motor speed and the Hooke's joint angle. The frequency of the vibration at the specimen increases with an increase 1n the motor speed but is independent of the Hooke's joint angle. Increasing the flywheel inertia decreases the variation in the flywheel angular velocity and maintains an output angular velocity which is nearly sinusoidal and closely approximates a second harmonic of the mean flywheel angular velocity"--Abstract, pages ii-iii.

Advisor(s)

Rocke, R. D. (Richard Dale), 1938-

Committee Member(s)

Johnson, R. T. (Richard T.)
Foster, J. Earl

Department(s)

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Mechanical Engineering

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

1970

Pagination

x, 77 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (page 84).

Rights

© 1970 Narayandas Trikamdas Ashar, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Vibration -- Mathematical models
Universal joints -- Vibration -- Mathematical models
Actuators
Torsion

Thesis Number

T 2500

Print OCLC #

6029473

Electronic OCLC #

869730174

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