Masters Theses

Author

Rong Shi

Keywords and Phrases

N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA)

Abstract

"Doxorubicin is a representative of the class of quinoid anthracycline antitumor drugs that are most widely used in cancer chemotherapy. Unfortunately, long-term treatment by doxorubicin is limited by cardiotoxicity due to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study was conducted to determine the effects of a new thiol antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), on doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. Our results suggest that doxorubicin (5/[mu]M) induces cardiotoxicity by increasing generation of ROS, decreasing levels of glutathione (GSH) and MTS, an important cell viability indicator, increasing malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and caspase-3 activity, decreasing activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase and inducing apoptosis. NACA protected H9c2 cells from doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity, as evaluated by MTS assay. It also significantly reduced the generation of ROS and decreased MDA in doxorubicin-treated cells. In addition, NACA increased the GSH level, as well as the GSH/GSSG ratio, and the increased caspase-3 activity was significantly decreased by NACA. The activities of antioxidant enzymes were also reduced by NACA"--Abstract, page iii.

Advisor(s)

Ercal, Nuran
Huang, Yue-wern

Committee Member(s)

Sinn, Ekkehard
Aronstam, Robert

Department(s)

Chemistry

Degree Name

M.S. in Chemistry

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

Fall 2006

Pagination

ix, 61 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 55-60).

Rights

© 2006 Rong Shi, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Restricted Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Antineoplastic agents -- Toxicology
Antioxidants
Doxorubicin
Oxidative stress

Thesis Number

T 9114

Print OCLC #

173611429

Electronic OCLC #

1081173912

Link to Catalog Record

Electronic access to the full-text of this document is restricted to Missouri S&T users. Otherwise, request this publication directly from Missouri S&T Library or contact your local library.

http://laurel.lso.missouri.edu/record=b5999603~S5

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