Masters Theses

Abstract

"Base-catalysed reactions normally involve complex series of transformations. their kinetics is usually governed by a variety of equilibria, participating in the overall and concurrent processes as well as by competitive side-reactions that interfere with the normal course of such reactions. Mechanisms which have been proposed, by and large, are primarily based on product, by-product and intermediate analyses together with some scattered kinetic and isotopic evidence. In the cases where kinetic studies have been attempted, highly complex mechanisms have usually been proposed due to the frequent necessity of using heterogeneous media or employing involved mathematical treatments to describe the kinetics of the base-catalysed reactions. One of the most common and the least thoroughly studied class of reactions in this general area is the "Michael Reaction". It is the name commonly assigned to the base-catalysed addition of an activated methylene compound, the addendum, to a suitably activated olefin, the acceptor, to yield normal or abnormal and retrogression Michael adducts ...


The work presented here was undertaken to test the validity of the existing Michael mechanism through the use of thermodynamic interpretation of the experimentally obtained kinetic data. The investigation involved the study of the effect of temperature variations on the rate of the Michael reaction"--Introduction, pages 1, 3.

Advisor(s)

Wulfman, David S., 1934-2013

Committee Member(s)

Johnson, James W., 1930-2002
Hanna, Samir B.
Stoffer, James O.

Department(s)

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Chemical Engineering

Publisher

University of Missouri at Rolla

Publication Date

1966

Pagination

vi, 87 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 83-85).

Rights

© 1966 Rohit Panalal Sheth, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Chemical reaction, Conditions and laws of
Chemical kinetics
Catalysis

Thesis Number

T 1853

Print OCLC #

5973183

Electronic OCLC #

896828197

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