Masters Theses

Abstract

"It is an accepted fact that the simple Maxwell and Voigt models do not usually represent the behavior of real materials. In order to make the results of a model more realistic, other combinations of springs and dashpots must be considered. To understand the more complicated models, it is desirable to have a knowledge of the Maxwell model since this element usually occurs either in series or in parallel in the advanced models. This investigation reports solutions of the spherical wave equation in both the elastic and viscoelastic media. Laplace transform techniques are used to obtain the parameters; stress, velocity, and acceleration for the Maxwell solid and velocity, acceleration, displacement, stress, and strain for the elastic solid. The delta pressure pulse was chosen because of its simple transform (unity) and because the solution for any other pressure pulse can be obtained by convolution. Simpson integration was performed to obtain the numerical data"--Abstract, page ii.

Advisor(s)

Hornsey, Edward

Committee Member(s)

Clark, George Bromley, 1912-
Davis, Robert L.

Department(s)

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Engineering Mechanics

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

1968

Pagination

vii, 43 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (leaves 18-23).

Rights

© 1968 William Francis Breig, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Dirac equation
Stress waves
Wave mechanics -- Mathematical models

Thesis Number

T 2120

Print OCLC #

5995627

Electronic OCLC #

803584038

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