Masters Theses

Abstract

"This report investigates a substitute for the impact damper which, although highly effective in reducing vibration amplitudes of near-resonant mechanical systems, in operation causes often unacceptable intensive noise. The present damper consists of a piston free to move in a cylinder, at either end of which is a ball valve set to open at a preset pressure, and in the middle along its length an intake port. An approximate analytical study is made to determine the conditions for the existence of "noiseless periodic operation" of the damper, periodic operation without the occurence of impacts. This approach is based on the describing function method which harmonically linearizes the nonlinear damping force involved in the equations of motion of the system. The excitation force to produce this periodic operation and the response results from this operation may be predicted by this analytical approach. Digital simulation of the system is used to verify the predictions by analytical approach. A study on a given system indicates that appropriate design parameters may be selected for a damper of this type to obtain a reduction in response amplitude of the primary system at resonance to 1/5 of its value without the damper. This is essentially the reduction that might be obtained with a properly designed impact damper. Unlike the impact damper, the new damper is expected to operate relatively noiselessly"--Abstract, pages ii-iii.

Advisor(s)

Cronin, Don

Committee Member(s)

Rocke, R. D. (Richard Dale), 1938-
Keith, Harold D. (Harold Dean), 1941-

Department(s)

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Mechanical Engineering

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

1972

Pagination

xi, 127 pages

Rights

© 1972 Nguyen Khanh Van, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Vibration -- Mathematical models
Damping (Mechanics) -- Mathematical models
Machinery -- Vibration

Thesis Number

T 2729

Print OCLC #

6033549

Electronic OCLC #

883305300

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