Masters Theses

Abstract

"Spectroscopy, in the region of the far ultraviolet from 100 Angstroms to 1000 Angstroms, requires special equipment and techniques, inasmuch as these wavelengths are highly absorbed by air. Many gases have resonant frequencies corresponding to the wavelengths mentioned and hence absorption bands appear in the spectrograms obtained by using spectrographs for the visible region. One solution of the problem of obtaining data in this region is to construct a spectrograph from which all intervening gas molecules have been removed, thus eliminating the absorbing material. A vacuum of 10⁻⁴ mm. of mercury is necessary to reduce the absorption to a value low enough to be neglible [sic] in effect. In addition to reducing absorption by gases, special methods of recording the spectral lines are required for these short wavelengths, as ordinary photographic film presents absorption by the gelatin of the film. A vacuum spectrograph capable of obtaining data in the far ultraviolet is a powerful tool in furthering our knowledge of atomic and molecular structure. Boyce shows the need for additional data in this region. It was felt that a vacuum spectrograph would provide a means of obtaining specific data which is nonexistent or incomplete, and construction of the instrument was undertaken"--Introduction, page 1-2.

Advisor(s)

Fuller, Harold Q., 1907-1996

Department(s)

Physics

Degree Name

M.S. in Physics

Sponsor(s)

Frederick G. Cottrell Research Grant, Research Corporation

Publisher

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy

Publication Date

1950

Pagination

iv, 48 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 105-106).

Rights

© 1950 Lawrey Huber Chapin, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy

Thesis Number

T 914

Print OCLC #

5981953

Electronic OCLC #

740054477

Included in

Physics Commons

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