Masters Theses

Abstract

"Various methods have been employed for the determination of surface tension including capillary rise, drop weight, maximum bubble pressure, sessile drops on flat surfaces, sessile bubbles formed underneath flat surfaces, and the shape of pendent drops. Each method is subject to characteristic advantages and disadvantages. Only two of these will be discussed. The method of maximum bubble pressure allows the formation of a fresh surface for every bubble but does not permit the study of a given sample over a period of time. The sessile drop in direct contrast, allows the observation of the same sample over any period of time, but retains the same surface for the entire run. This is not considered a serious objection, since Burden has shown in the case of mercury in contact with hydrogen, that the adsorption of the monolayer of gas from the protective atmosphere takes place in the period of time required for the formation of the new surface. If this condition exists for the other molten metals in contact with hydrogen, no great benefit is to be derived from the formation of a new surface for each determination. The sessile drop was chosen for this experiment because, as has been mentioned, it is possible for this method to observe the sample over long periods and atmospheric control is relatively easy to achieve"--Introduction, page 2-3.

Advisor(s)

Fisher, Emory D.

Department(s)

Physics

Degree Name

M.S. in Physics

Publisher

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy

Publication Date

1950

Pagination

iv, 45 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 71-74).

Rights

© 1950 Edward M. Chandler, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Surface tension -- Measurement

Thesis Number

T 900

Print OCLC #

5981594

Electronic OCLC #

733840905

Included in

Physics Commons

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