Masters Theses

Abstract

"Many studies have been made on the surface tension of metals but almost exclusively in the liquid state. Information on metals in the solid state is needed in pure physics to test theories of cohesion and in physical metallurgy to explain sintering. The common approach to the problem of surface tension in the solid state is to hang a weight on a thin wire or leaf of metal and then heat this weighted sample to a temperature at which flow is appreciable. The shrinkage or stretch of the sample is then a measure of the surface tension. Of the recent publications in the field of surface tension of solids, two deserve comment. Tammann and Boehe determined the surface tension of gold by the weighted leaf method. The accuracy of this method is doubtful because of the tendency of foil to form minute tears under tension. Udin, Shaler, and Wulff used weighted copper wires to determine the surface tension of copper. Since the wires had to be very fine to detect surface tension, very elaborate equipment was required. In this paper, the problem was approached in a different fashion, which permitted the use of much simpler apparatus. Rather than add a weight to a hinging wire, the weight of the sample itself was balanced against the surface tension. The equilibrium shape of the sample enabled its surface tension to be calculated"--Introduction, page 1-2.

Advisor(s)

Fisher, Edward

Department(s)

Physics

Degree Name

M.S. in Physics

Publisher

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy

Publication Date

1949

Pagination

iv, 32 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 44-45).

Rights

© 1949 Charles M. Rice, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Solid state physics -- Methodology
Surface tension
Tin

Thesis Number

T 868

Print OCLC #

5980252

Electronic OCLC #

701561208

Included in

Physics Commons

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