Masters Theses

Abstract

"The element titanium has a high degree of chemical activity at room temperature when in a finely divided condition. In the massive state this activity is only exhibited at high temperatures. The powdered metal is highly pyrophoric. Titanium forms quite stable sulphides and carbides, although these are subject to oxidation at high temperatures. It also form nitrides. Titanium being a transitional element forms hydrides with hydrogen which are stable at ordinary temperatures, but which dissociate at red heat liberating the hydrogen and leaving the metallic titanium in a very active state. Alloys are formed with such metals as aluminum, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, tin and gallium. F. S. Wartman states that titanium in alloying with the other elements tends to form intermetallic compounds that are insoluble in the solid state or if solid solutions are formed the tendency is toward those which are stable only in the liquid state. Such conditions favor the formation of brittle alloys of little structural value"--Introduction, page 1-2.

Advisor(s)

Eppelsheimer, Daniel S., 1909-1988

Department(s)

Materials Science and Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Metallurgical Engineering

Publisher

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy

Publication Date

1949

Pagination

vii, 68 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (leaves 26-27).

Rights

© 1949 August Savu, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Chemical equilibrium
Copper-titanium alloys
Titanium -- Metallurgy

Thesis Number

T 832

Print OCLC #

5977729

Electronic OCLC #

670073585

Included in

Metallurgy Commons

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