Masters Theses

Abstract

"The determination of the mean molecular weight of oils and paraffin waxes may have significance as: (1) an important property from a purely research point of view; (2) a step towards structure determination; (3) a study of molecular association with viscosity, making possible the application of well established viscosity binary mixture formulas to oil blends and oil and paraffin wax blends; (4) an aid in the calculations of latent heats for refinery engineering purposes (see A.A. Ashworth's applications of this property); (5) a possible means for identifying bitumens of unknown origin, and determining the approximate proportion of each type in blends; (6) as a means of giving application of Raoult's law for comparison of experimentally determined vapor pressures of oils to the calculated values. It was with this view of studying viscosity effects of paraffin wax upon lubricating oils and to approximate the probable number of carbon atoms in various melting point paraffin waxes, that this investigation was undertaken"--Introduction, page [1].

Advisor(s)

Dunlap, Howard Leroy

Department(s)

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Chemical Engineering

Sponsor(s)

Kendall Oil Company (Bradford, Pa.)
Shell Oil Company
Standard Oil Company (Indiana)
Texaco Salt Products Company (Tulsa, Okla.)

Publisher

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy

Publication Date

1934

Pagination

iii, 64 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 42-43).

Rights

© 1934 Charles Leo William Hunze, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Lubricating oils -- Viscosity
Paraffin wax

Thesis Number

T 632

Print OCLC #

5964354

Electronic OCLC #

663903012

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