Masters Theses

Abstract

"Sodium thiosulfate was one of the pioneer reagents used in photography, and is still the most important reagent used in photographic fixing. The solubility of the silver halides in an excess of sodium thiosulfate makes it important as a reagent for removing the undeveloped silver halides from the film. The life of a fixing bath is controlled by the halogen content. As the ratio of halogens to sodium thiosulfate is increased, the time required for fixing is also increased until the ratio reaches such a point that fogging of the film results. Most of the solutions are discarded long before this ratio is reached...The removal of silver from these solutions is relatively easy and has been accomplished on a commercial scale. The recovery of the sodium thiosulfate, bromine, and iodine is a more difficult problem. The recovery of these constituents in a marketable or usable form would represent a valuble [sic] contribution to the photographic industries as well as to the chemistry of these "Hypo" solutions"--Introduction, page 1-2.

Advisor(s)

Schrenk, Walter T.

Department(s)

Chemistry

Degree Name

M.S. in Chemistry

Publisher

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy

Publication Date

1937

Pagination

iv, 44 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (leaf 66).

Rights

© 1937 LeRoy Agustave Bay, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Photographic chemicals
Photographic chemistry
Thiosulfates

Thesis Number

T 660

Print OCLC #

5965649

Electronic OCLC #

641582950

Included in

Chemistry Commons

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