Masters Theses

Alternative Title

Corrosion of Ni3Si alloys in sulfuric acid

Abstract

"Hydrogen production from water, the world's most renewable natural resource, can provide an economical and sustainable form of energy for the future. One means to achieve this is with a nuclear reactor-based sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle. Currently there are few materials available, other than precious metals like gold and platinum, that possess the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties required for the sulfuric acid decomposition loop of the S-I process. However, alloys based on Ni₃Si show promise to be a more affordable, corrosion resistant materials option for this technology. In this study, the corrosion behavior of NiSi₂₂ and NiSi₂₀(Nb,Ti)₃ alloys in boiling 70 wt. % sulfuric acid is examined. The mechanism that provides corrosion resistance for these alloys is the formation of an inert SiO₂ surface film which spontaneously grows in oxidizing acid mediums. However, niobium and titanium alloying each have very different effects on the corrosion behavior. The results presented herein indicate that niobium alloying enhances the corrosion resistance of Ni₃Si, whereas titanium alloying has deleterious effects. The changes in corrosion behavior that are imparted by niobium and titanium alloying are linked to the alloy properties, and are the focus of this research"--Abstract, page iii.

Advisor(s)

Brow, Richard K.

Committee Member(s)

Miller, F. Scott, 1956-
Newkirk, Joseph William

Department(s)

Materials Science and Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Materials Science and Engineering

Sponsor(s)

United States. Department of Energy

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

Spring 2009

Pagination

x, 92 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (page 28).

Rights

© 2009 Christopher M. Larson, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Hydrogen as fuel
Nickel alloys -- Mechanical properties
Nickel
Silicides

Thesis Number

T 9490

Print OCLC #

436096166

Electronic OCLC #

319431063

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