Masters Theses

Keywords and Phrases

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD); Volume of fluid (VOF) method

Abstract

"Semiconductor devices form the essential components of most electronic devices. The fabrication of circuit elements to manufacture these devices is done by a process known as photolithography, using photoresist layer deposition, optical masks, and etching. As feature sizes become smaller, higher optical precision is required, necessitating an optically flat surface on the photoresist layer. The surface of the photoresist layer can become uneven because of conformation to the topography of the layers underneath or a change in shape of the layer after evaporation of solvent. To combat this, Brewer Science, Inc. has developed a contact planarization process (CON-TACT®) in which an optically flat surface is used to transfer its planarity to the surface of the photoresist. However, due to high pressure from the viscous photoresist fluid during the process, the optically flat surface becomes deformed. To solve this problem, a detailed simulation and analysis of the pressure distribution along the plate is needed to find the optimal conditions to reduce the deformation of the optically flat surface. In the current work, the CFD package FLUENT was used to simulate the evaporation and planarization processes"--Abstract, page iii.

Advisor(s)

Henthorn, Kimberly H.

Committee Member(s)

Neogi, P. (Partho), 1951-
Isaac, Kakkattukuzhy M.

Department(s)

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Chemical Engineering

Sponsor(s)

Brewer Science Corporation

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

Fall 2007

Pagination

xii, 80 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 66-69).

Rights

© 2007 Shanti Vusirikala, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Chemical mechanical planarization
FLUENT (Computer file)
Fluid dynamics -- Computer simulation
Multiphase flow

Thesis Number

T 9289

Print OCLC #

234389815

Electronic OCLC #

213888751

Share

 
COinS