Masters Theses

Abstract

"The need for the study of microfossils such as foraminifera, conodonts, and otoliths as stratigraphic tools has been well established. However, disarticulated parts such as otoliths and conodonts cannot be effectively used unless they can be recognized. Otoliths, although somewhat unrecognized in the geological record, are far more abundant than articulated skeletons (Frizzell, 1965, p. 86). Therefore, much investigation is being conducted to reveal the origin, function, morphology, and usefulness of the otoliths of fishes.

In this investigation, the asteriscus, well developed only in Ostariophysins (of which the carp is a member), is studied for morphology. New tentative terms are used to name previously undesignated parts. The origin and development of otoliths has been studied and it is shown that the nuclei of otoliths originate as a mass of individual crystals rather than a single tiny crystal. Finally, the possible methods of preservation of carp otoliths are discussed"--Abstract, page ii.

Advisor(s)

Spreng, Alfred C., 1923-2012

Committee Member(s)

Grant, S. Kerry
Gale, Nord L.

Department(s)

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Geology

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

1973

Pagination

vii, 83 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 80-82).

Rights

© 1973 Larry Paul Coen, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Restricted Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Otoliths
Carp
Otoliths -- Morphology

Thesis Number

T 2906

Print OCLC #

6019921

Electronic OCLC #

911927114

Link to Catalog Record

Electronic access to the full-text of this document is restricted to Missouri S&T users. Otherwise, request this publication directly from Missouri S&T Library or contact your local library.

http://laurel.lso.missouri.edu/record=b1067040~S5

Comments

"My greatest acknowledgement is, of course, to my former advisor, Professor Donald L. Frizzell, who inspired my interest in micropaleontology and who wanted very much to have this study done and see the results of it; however, he passed away before this was possible."--Acknowledgement, page iii.

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