Masters Theses

Abstract

"Most gases, and particularly oxygen and nitrogen, are nearly opaque to radiation in the region from about 1800 Å downward to about 2 Å and hence, for spectroscopic work in this region, the removal of these gases is mandatory. Popular usage generally refers to the range mentioned above as the vacuum ultraviolet. That there remains much experimental work to be done in the vacuum ultraviolet has been pointed out by Boyce in his exhaustive survey of vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy. In order to fill in some of these gaps, Mr. L. H. Chapin, in the, spring of 1950, undertook the construction of a grazing incidence vacuum spectrograph for use in the region 100 Å to 1,000 Å. Due to circumstances beyond his control, Mr. Chapin was unable to complete the instrument in the time available to him, and the present author was assigned to the project in September, 1950"--Introduction, pages 1-2.

Advisor(s)

Fuller, Harold Q., 1907-1996

Department(s)

Physics

Degree Name

M.S. in Physics

Sponsor(s)

Research Corporation

Publisher

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy

Publication Date

1951

Pagination

v, 50 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 47-49).

Rights

© 1951 William Clinton Johnson-Chamberlain, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Spectrograph -- Design and construction
Vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy
Ultraviolet spectra

Thesis Number

T 997

Print OCLC #

5985359

Electronic OCLC #

947106068

Comments

"A Frederick G. Cottrell research grant, by the Research Corporation has made possible the financing of the project"--Acknowledgements, page ii.

Included in

Physics Commons

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