Masters Theses

Abstract

"Stress analysis as applied to mine openings ranges from the completely empirical to the completely theoretical. However, it is only through the ultimate utilization of the two methods that a guide to the Interpretation of mine stress phenomenon may be obtained. The bridge between the two approaches lies in the field of model study. Specifically, this is an Investigation into determining the feasibility of using multilayered photoelastic materials in models such that a more exact approximation of the underground stress distribution around mine openings can be made.

The two major objectives in this study for determining the feasibility of using multilayered photoelastic material were as follows:

1) To develop a material which can be used as a photoelastic material and easily cast into sheets having different physical constants.

2) To apply this material to a solution of a specific problem. That is the analysis of the stress distribution around a circular opening occurring In two layers of material with different moduli of elasticity.

The Importance of the stress distribution around mine openings can be summed up into two parts:

1) The design of the mine opening could lessen the stress concentration, thereby, providing a safer environment for the mine workers;

2) The amount of materials and supports can be optimized, thus increasing the percentage recovery of ore"--Introduction, leaves 1-2.

Advisor(s)

Clark, George Bromley, 1912-

Committee Member(s)

Heagler, John B., 1924-1999
Lee, Ralph E.
Davidson, R. F.

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Mining Engineering

Publisher

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy

Publication Date

1962

Pagination

v, 48 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographical references (pages 44-47).

Rights

© 1962 Donald Haber, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Mine roof control
Strains and stresses
Stress concentration

Thesis Number

T 1377

Print OCLC #

5937836

Electronic OCLC #

982381433

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