Masters Theses

Abstract

"After due consideration of the facts and hypothetical conditions enumerated herein, it was decided that this work would be devoted to developing a means of determining the most economical “C” factor to be used; one that will be consistent with ease of operating the plotting machine, the required accuracy of the finished compilation and economy. In other words, the highest value of the "C" factor that will produce results within the accuracy requirements under normal operating procedures.

As a secondary project, it was decided to plot a curve using points determined by analyzing a series of spot readings made at each altitude tested. In well flattened models, this test should provide a well graduated series of points such that the resultant curve might be considered as an accuracy rating or "C" factor curve ascribable to the plotting instrument itself, the human element being practically a constant.

It is not expected that this thesis will present a complete and fool-proof answer to the problem. It is hoped, however, that a method of approach leading to a reasonable solution will be presented that will make a start in the right direction and justify additional research that will finally divulge an answer satisfactory to all concerned"--Purpose of Research, page 5.

Advisor(s)

Carlton, E. W.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Civil Engineering

Publisher

Missouri School of Mines and Metallurgy

Publication Date

1952

Pagination

vi, 46 pages

Rights

© 1952 David Hunter Robinson, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Open Access

File Type

text

Language

English

Library of Congress Subject Headings

Photographic surveying
Aerial photography
Cartography

Thesis Number

T 1039

Print OCLC #

5150835

Electronic OCLC #

918988989

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