Session Start Date

11-10-2016

Session End Date

11-10-2016

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to provide progress on development and validation of reduced order models for the in plane strength and stiffness of profiled steel panels appropriate for use in structural models of an entire building. Profiled steel panels, i.e, metal deck, often serve as a key distribution element in building lateral force resisting systems. Acting largely as an in-plane shear diaphragm, metal deck as employed in walls, roofs, and floors plays a key role in creating and driving three-dimensional building response. As structural modeling evolves from two-dimensional frameworks to fully three-dimensional buildings, accurate and computationally efficient models of profiled steel panels are needed. Three-dimensional building response is increasingly required by ever-evolving structural standards, particularly in seismic design, and structural efficiency demands that the benefits of three-dimensional response be leveraged in design. Equivalent orthotropic plate models provide a potential reduced order model for profiled steel panels that is investigated in this paper. A recent proposal for the rigidities in such a model are assessed against shell finite element models of profiled steel panels. In addition, the impact of discrete connections and discrete panels, as occurs in an actual roof system, are assessed when applying these reduced order models. Extension of equivalent orthotropic plate models to elastic buckling and strength, in addition to stiffness, both represent work in progress, but initial results are provided. Examples show that equivalent orthotropic plate models must be used with care to yield useful results. This effort is an initial step in developing efficient whole building models that accurately incorporate the behavior of profiled steel panels as diaphragms.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Research Center/Lab(s)

Wei-Wen Yu Center for Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Meeting Name

International Specialty Conference on Cold-Formed Steel Structures 2016

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

11-10-2016

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2016 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Available for download on Thursday, November 01, 2018

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Reduced Order Models for Profiled Steel Diaphragm Panels

The objective of this paper is to provide progress on development and validation of reduced order models for the in plane strength and stiffness of profiled steel panels appropriate for use in structural models of an entire building. Profiled steel panels, i.e, metal deck, often serve as a key distribution element in building lateral force resisting systems. Acting largely as an in-plane shear diaphragm, metal deck as employed in walls, roofs, and floors plays a key role in creating and driving three-dimensional building response. As structural modeling evolves from two-dimensional frameworks to fully three-dimensional buildings, accurate and computationally efficient models of profiled steel panels are needed. Three-dimensional building response is increasingly required by ever-evolving structural standards, particularly in seismic design, and structural efficiency demands that the benefits of three-dimensional response be leveraged in design. Equivalent orthotropic plate models provide a potential reduced order model for profiled steel panels that is investigated in this paper. A recent proposal for the rigidities in such a model are assessed against shell finite element models of profiled steel panels. In addition, the impact of discrete connections and discrete panels, as occurs in an actual roof system, are assessed when applying these reduced order models. Extension of equivalent orthotropic plate models to elastic buckling and strength, in addition to stiffness, both represent work in progress, but initial results are provided. Examples show that equivalent orthotropic plate models must be used with care to yield useful results. This effort is an initial step in developing efficient whole building models that accurately incorporate the behavior of profiled steel panels as diaphragms.