Session Start Date

11-6-2014

Session End Date

11-6-2014

Keywords and Phrases

Cold-Formed Steel Structures; Light Gauge Steel Roofing Systems; Steel Battens; Wind Uplift Forces; Pull-Through Failures; Experiments; Design Rules

Abstract

Thin profiled steel roof sheeting and battens are increasingly used in the construction of roofing systems of residential, commercial, industrial and farm buildings in Australia. The critical load combination of external wind suction and internal wind pressures that occur during high wind events such as thunderstorms and tropical cyclones often dislocate the roofing systems partially or even completely due to premature roof connection failures. Past wind damage investigations have shown that roof sheeting failures occurred at their screw connections to battens. In most of these cases, the screw fastener head pulled through the thin roof sheeting whilst the screw fasteners also pulled out from the battens. Research studies undertaken on the roof sheeting to batten connection failures have improved this situation. However, the batten to rafter or truss connections have not been investigated adequately. Failure of these connections can cause the failure of the entire roof structure as observed during recent high wind events. Therefore a detailed experimental study consisting of both small scale and full scale tests has been undertaken to investigate the steel roof batten pull-through failures in relation to many critical parameters such as steel batten geometry, thickness and grade, screw fastener head sizes and screw tightening. This paper presents the details of this experimental study and the pull-through failure load results obtained from them. Finally it discusses the development of suitable design rules that can be used to determine the pull-through connection capacities of thin steel roof battens under wind uplift loads.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Research Center/Lab(s)

Wei-Wen Yu Center for Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Sponsor(s)

Australian Research Council

Meeting Name

22nd International Specialty Conference on Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

11-6-2014

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2014 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Pull-Through Failure Tests of Thin Steel Roof Battens under Wind Uplift Loads

Thin profiled steel roof sheeting and battens are increasingly used in the construction of roofing systems of residential, commercial, industrial and farm buildings in Australia. The critical load combination of external wind suction and internal wind pressures that occur during high wind events such as thunderstorms and tropical cyclones often dislocate the roofing systems partially or even completely due to premature roof connection failures. Past wind damage investigations have shown that roof sheeting failures occurred at their screw connections to battens. In most of these cases, the screw fastener head pulled through the thin roof sheeting whilst the screw fasteners also pulled out from the battens. Research studies undertaken on the roof sheeting to batten connection failures have improved this situation. However, the batten to rafter or truss connections have not been investigated adequately. Failure of these connections can cause the failure of the entire roof structure as observed during recent high wind events. Therefore a detailed experimental study consisting of both small scale and full scale tests has been undertaken to investigate the steel roof batten pull-through failures in relation to many critical parameters such as steel batten geometry, thickness and grade, screw fastener head sizes and screw tightening. This paper presents the details of this experimental study and the pull-through failure load results obtained from them. Finally it discusses the development of suitable design rules that can be used to determine the pull-through connection capacities of thin steel roof battens under wind uplift loads.