Session Start Date

8-24-2012

Session End Date

8-25-2012

Abstract

This paper points out that the shear lag factors embedded in the design equations specified in the North American, European and Australasian cold-formed steel structures codes for determining the net section tension capacity of bolted connections in flat steel sheets either yield “anomalous” results or become irrelevant when they exceed unity. The anomaly is demonstrated through laboratory tests and is explained using simple calculus. A proper mathematical expression for the in-plane shear lag factor, which does not suffer from the anomaly of the code equations and never implies shear lag factors greater than unity for any configuration, is presented and found to yield improved results compared to the current code equations. A resistance factor of 0.8 for the proposed equation is determined with respect to the LRFD approach given in the North American specification for the design of cold-formed steel structures.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Research Center/Lab(s)

Wei-Wen Yu Center for Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Meeting Name

21st International Specialty Conference on Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

8-24-2012

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2012 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Aug 24th, 12:00 AM Aug 25th, 12:00 AM

In-plane Shear Lag of Bolted Connections

This paper points out that the shear lag factors embedded in the design equations specified in the North American, European and Australasian cold-formed steel structures codes for determining the net section tension capacity of bolted connections in flat steel sheets either yield “anomalous” results or become irrelevant when they exceed unity. The anomaly is demonstrated through laboratory tests and is explained using simple calculus. A proper mathematical expression for the in-plane shear lag factor, which does not suffer from the anomaly of the code equations and never implies shear lag factors greater than unity for any configuration, is presented and found to yield improved results compared to the current code equations. A resistance factor of 0.8 for the proposed equation is determined with respect to the LRFD approach given in the North American specification for the design of cold-formed steel structures.