Session Start Date

10-17-2002

Abstract

The 1 1/2" composite deck section is among the more popular floor systems used in the construction of steel buildings in North America. The shear-bond between the steel deck and the concrete normally controls the capacity of a composite floor slab. Shear-bond can, for the most part, be attributed to the presence of mechanical interlock that results from the use of embossments formed in the deck webs during the rolling process. However, the extent of shear resistance between the concrete and the steel can also vary depending on the deck profile, steel thickness and grade, coating, as well as the deck position, i.e. normal or inverted. In addition, the curing time of the concrete may influence the shear resistance of the composite slab. This paper describes the results of two research projects in which the effect of some of these variables on shear-bond capacity was evaluated.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Research Center/Lab(s)

Wei-Wen Yu Center for Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Meeting Name

16th International Specialty Conference on Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

10-17-2002

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2002 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Oct 17th, 12:00 AM

Variables Affecting the Shear-bond Resistance of Composite Floor Deck Systems

The 1 1/2" composite deck section is among the more popular floor systems used in the construction of steel buildings in North America. The shear-bond between the steel deck and the concrete normally controls the capacity of a composite floor slab. Shear-bond can, for the most part, be attributed to the presence of mechanical interlock that results from the use of embossments formed in the deck webs during the rolling process. However, the extent of shear resistance between the concrete and the steel can also vary depending on the deck profile, steel thickness and grade, coating, as well as the deck position, i.e. normal or inverted. In addition, the curing time of the concrete may influence the shear resistance of the composite slab. This paper describes the results of two research projects in which the effect of some of these variables on shear-bond capacity was evaluated.