Session Start Date

10-17-2002

Abstract

The Direct Strength method is a new design procedure for cold-formed steel members. The method employs elastic buckling solutions for the cross-section, instead of the element-by-element plate buckling solutions used in traditional design. The use of cross-section elastic buckling solutions insures inter-element compatibility and equilibrium. The Direct Strength method uses strength formulas on the gross section, similar to conventional column curves, for capacity prediction in local and distortional buckling. This avoids effective section calculations altogether. The reliability of the Direct Strength method is demonstrated for a broad selection of beams and columns by comparison with existing test data. Extension of the method to beam-columns is discussed and a solution proposed and demonstrated. Areas needing further research for final implementation are highlighted. The Appendix to the paper provides detailed "specification style" language appropriate for employing the Direct Strength method for the design of beams and columns.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Research Center/Lab(s)

Wei-Wen Yu Center for Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Meeting Name

16th International Specialty Conference on Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

10-17-2002

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2002 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Oct 17th, 12:00 AM

Progress on the Direct Strength Method

The Direct Strength method is a new design procedure for cold-formed steel members. The method employs elastic buckling solutions for the cross-section, instead of the element-by-element plate buckling solutions used in traditional design. The use of cross-section elastic buckling solutions insures inter-element compatibility and equilibrium. The Direct Strength method uses strength formulas on the gross section, similar to conventional column curves, for capacity prediction in local and distortional buckling. This avoids effective section calculations altogether. The reliability of the Direct Strength method is demonstrated for a broad selection of beams and columns by comparison with existing test data. Extension of the method to beam-columns is discussed and a solution proposed and demonstrated. Areas needing further research for final implementation are highlighted. The Appendix to the paper provides detailed "specification style" language appropriate for employing the Direct Strength method for the design of beams and columns.