Session Start Date

10-19-2000

Abstract

The response of cold-formed steel-frame shear walls to lateral forces is the focus of the paper. Results are presented for monotonic and cyclic tests of sixteen full-size shear walls with and without openings. Walls of five configurations with sheathing area ratio ranging from 1.0 to 0.3 were tested. The specimens were 12-m (40-ft.) long and 2.4-m (8-ft.) high with 11-mm (7/16-in.) oriented strandboard (OSB) sheathing. One specimen had additional 13-mm (0.5-in.) gypsum wallboard sheathing. All specimens were tested in horizontal position with no dead load applied in the plane of the wall. Resistance of walls was compared with predictions of the perforated shear wall design method. During monotonic and cyclic tests, steel-frame walls failed in a stepwise manner due to bending of framing elements and head pull-through of sheathing screws. No fatigue of mechanical connections was observed. Cyclic loading did not affect elastic performance of the walls but significantly reduced their deformation capacity. Fully-sheathed walls were significantly stiffer and stronger but significantly less ductile than walls with openings. Gypsum sheathing was additive to the stiffness and strength of fully-sheathed walls during monotonic tests. Predictions of the perforated shear wall method appeared to be conservative at all levels of loading when overturning anchors are present at the ends of the wall specimen.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Research Center/Lab(s)

Wei-Wen Yu Center for Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Meeting Name

15th International Specialty Conference on Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

10-19-2000

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2000 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Oct 19th, 12:00 AM

Racking Performance of Long Steel-frame Shear Walls

The response of cold-formed steel-frame shear walls to lateral forces is the focus of the paper. Results are presented for monotonic and cyclic tests of sixteen full-size shear walls with and without openings. Walls of five configurations with sheathing area ratio ranging from 1.0 to 0.3 were tested. The specimens were 12-m (40-ft.) long and 2.4-m (8-ft.) high with 11-mm (7/16-in.) oriented strandboard (OSB) sheathing. One specimen had additional 13-mm (0.5-in.) gypsum wallboard sheathing. All specimens were tested in horizontal position with no dead load applied in the plane of the wall. Resistance of walls was compared with predictions of the perforated shear wall design method. During monotonic and cyclic tests, steel-frame walls failed in a stepwise manner due to bending of framing elements and head pull-through of sheathing screws. No fatigue of mechanical connections was observed. Cyclic loading did not affect elastic performance of the walls but significantly reduced their deformation capacity. Fully-sheathed walls were significantly stiffer and stronger but significantly less ductile than walls with openings. Gypsum sheathing was additive to the stiffness and strength of fully-sheathed walls during monotonic tests. Predictions of the perforated shear wall method appeared to be conservative at all levels of loading when overturning anchors are present at the ends of the wall specimen.