Session Start Date

10-17-1996

Abstract

The results of a series of reversed cyclic 4 ft. x 8 ft. (length x height) 15/32-in. plywood and 7/16-in. oriented strand board (OSB) shear wall tests are presented in this paper. The walls were framed with C-shaped 3-1/2 in. 20 gauge (0.036 in.) studs at 24 in. on center. Each wall was subjected to a sequential phase displacement time history at a frequency of 0.67 Hz. Performance of the wall was shown to depend on the type of sheathing material, the strength of the chord studs, and the screw fastener schedule. Although the hysteretic loops were significantly pinched (a characteristic of the light framed shear wall), the wall was shown to be capable of dissipating significant energy before failure. Based on these limited test data, recommendations for interpretation of these data for design are presented.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Research Center/Lab(s)

Wei-Wen Yu Center for Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Meeting Name

13th International Specialty Conference on Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

10-17-1996

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1996 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Oct 17th, 12:00 AM

Dynamic Performance of Light Gauge Steel Framed Shear Walls

The results of a series of reversed cyclic 4 ft. x 8 ft. (length x height) 15/32-in. plywood and 7/16-in. oriented strand board (OSB) shear wall tests are presented in this paper. The walls were framed with C-shaped 3-1/2 in. 20 gauge (0.036 in.) studs at 24 in. on center. Each wall was subjected to a sequential phase displacement time history at a frequency of 0.67 Hz. Performance of the wall was shown to depend on the type of sheathing material, the strength of the chord studs, and the screw fastener schedule. Although the hysteretic loops were significantly pinched (a characteristic of the light framed shear wall), the wall was shown to be capable of dissipating significant energy before failure. Based on these limited test data, recommendations for interpretation of these data for design are presented.