Session Start Date

10-17-1996

Abstract

A revision to the Canadian Standard (S136-94)[1] and the American Specification (AISI- 89)[2], in which the procedure to calculate the effective width of an edge-stiffened compressive flange is modified, has been proposed by Dinovitzer et al.[3]. The proposal involves a change of the equations for the flange plate buckling coefficients of Case II compressive elements, which eliminates a discontinuity in the effective width formulation. The modified local buckling procedure was compared with the current Canadian Cold Formed Steel Standard using a program of beam tests at the University of Waterloo[4] and data available in the literature[8,9, 10, 11,12]. Statistical results of the comparison indicate that the revised method is more accurate than current design standards and use of this procedure simplifies the current plate buckling equations. It is recommended that the Dinovitzer approach be adopted by the North American Design Standards.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Research Center/Lab(s)

Wei-Wen Yu Center for Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Meeting Name

13th International Specialty Conference on Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

10-17-1996

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1996 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Interaction of Flange/edge - Stiffened Cold Formed Steel C - Sections

A revision to the Canadian Standard (S136-94)[1] and the American Specification (AISI- 89)[2], in which the procedure to calculate the effective width of an edge-stiffened compressive flange is modified, has been proposed by Dinovitzer et al.[3]. The proposal involves a change of the equations for the flange plate buckling coefficients of Case II compressive elements, which eliminates a discontinuity in the effective width formulation. The modified local buckling procedure was compared with the current Canadian Cold Formed Steel Standard using a program of beam tests at the University of Waterloo[4] and data available in the literature[8,9, 10, 11,12]. Statistical results of the comparison indicate that the revised method is more accurate than current design standards and use of this procedure simplifies the current plate buckling equations. It is recommended that the Dinovitzer approach be adopted by the North American Design Standards.