Location

Saint Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

10-18-1994

Abstract

The primary goal of the subject study was to investigate the behavior and load capacity of stub columns using cold-reduced, low-ductility steel versus un-reduced, normal-ductility steel. Specimens that were cold-reduced were also welded transversely across the entire stud cross section. Therefore, this study also yielded data with regard to the axial performance of welded studs. In addition, since stub columns were punched and un-punched, further conclusions can be drawn about the effect of a weld located at a web perforation. A total of 133 stub column tests were performed at the Dietrich Material Testing Laboratory in Hammond, Indiana, between December 14 and December 20 of 1993, and on January 27 of 1994. Tests were conducted using two procedures. The first test procedure used a track at each end of the stub column. The second test procedure did not use a track. Grouting or welding was not used in either test procedure. There was no need for special end preparations since specimens were cut with very close tolerances regarding end squareness. From the test data the following conclusions can be drawn. First, the presence of a weld in a stud had no effect on the stub column load capacity. Second, the presence of a weld at a knockout had no effect on the stub column load capacity. Third, reduced stub columns fared very favorably in load capacity when compared to the 1986 AISI specification as long as 75 percent of the yield strength is used per AISI Specification, Section A3.3.2. Fourth, it is recommended that Section A3.3.1 of the AISI Specification be changed to include steel having Fᵤ/Fᵧ ratios of 1. 01, elongations in a 2 in. gage length of three percent, and elongations in a 1/2 in. gage length of ten percent.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Research Center/Lab(s)

Wei-Wen Yu Center for Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Meeting Name

12th International Specialty Conference on Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

10-18-1994

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1994 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Oct 18th, 12:00 AM

Stub Column Study Using Welded, Cold-reduced Steel

Saint Louis, Missouri

The primary goal of the subject study was to investigate the behavior and load capacity of stub columns using cold-reduced, low-ductility steel versus un-reduced, normal-ductility steel. Specimens that were cold-reduced were also welded transversely across the entire stud cross section. Therefore, this study also yielded data with regard to the axial performance of welded studs. In addition, since stub columns were punched and un-punched, further conclusions can be drawn about the effect of a weld located at a web perforation. A total of 133 stub column tests were performed at the Dietrich Material Testing Laboratory in Hammond, Indiana, between December 14 and December 20 of 1993, and on January 27 of 1994. Tests were conducted using two procedures. The first test procedure used a track at each end of the stub column. The second test procedure did not use a track. Grouting or welding was not used in either test procedure. There was no need for special end preparations since specimens were cut with very close tolerances regarding end squareness. From the test data the following conclusions can be drawn. First, the presence of a weld in a stud had no effect on the stub column load capacity. Second, the presence of a weld at a knockout had no effect on the stub column load capacity. Third, reduced stub columns fared very favorably in load capacity when compared to the 1986 AISI specification as long as 75 percent of the yield strength is used per AISI Specification, Section A3.3.2. Fourth, it is recommended that Section A3.3.1 of the AISI Specification be changed to include steel having Fᵤ/Fᵧ ratios of 1. 01, elongations in a 2 in. gage length of three percent, and elongations in a 1/2 in. gage length of ten percent.