Location

Rolla, Missouri

Start Date

8-14-2018 9:00 AM

End Date

8-14-2018 9:30 AM

Description

Fatigue cracks need to be monitored in fatigue critical elements. Previous research by the PI produced a radiofrequency identification (RFID) sensor prototype that can accurately measure tens of micro-strains in laboratory. The antenna sensor was made on a glass microfiber-reinforced polymer substrate. Although accurate for strain measurement and detection of fatigue cracks, the sensor performs less satisfactorily in field conditions since the substrate material (RT/duroid® 5880) is susceptible to thermal effect. In addition, a wireless interrogation distance by a general-purpose commercial RFID reader is limited to the order of meter, which is not desirable with the operation of a UAV. The commercial reader also weighs over 30 N and costs approximately $30k.

This project aims to develop and validate a light antenna sensor (1 kg) with new substrate materials that can be accurately interrogated at a desirable distance (over 30 m) in field applications, and develop and test a customized RFID reader that costs less than $3k for effective monitoring of bridges.

Meeting Name

INSPIRE-UTC 2018 Annual Meeting

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Document Type

Presentation

Document Version

Final Version

File Type

text

Language(s)

English

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Aug 14th, 9:00 AM Aug 14th, 9:30 AM

Battery-free Antenna Sensors for Strain and Crack Monitoring of Bridge Structures

Rolla, Missouri

Fatigue cracks need to be monitored in fatigue critical elements. Previous research by the PI produced a radiofrequency identification (RFID) sensor prototype that can accurately measure tens of micro-strains in laboratory. The antenna sensor was made on a glass microfiber-reinforced polymer substrate. Although accurate for strain measurement and detection of fatigue cracks, the sensor performs less satisfactorily in field conditions since the substrate material (RT/duroid® 5880) is susceptible to thermal effect. In addition, a wireless interrogation distance by a general-purpose commercial RFID reader is limited to the order of meter, which is not desirable with the operation of a UAV. The commercial reader also weighs over 30 N and costs approximately $30k.

This project aims to develop and validate a light antenna sensor (1 kg) with new substrate materials that can be accurately interrogated at a desirable distance (over 30 m) in field applications, and develop and test a customized RFID reader that costs less than $3k for effective monitoring of bridges.