Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

3-26-2001

Session End Date

3-31-2001

Abstract

In this paper, the results of an experimental investigation on the response of model shallow footings to horizontal accelerations are presented. The experiments were conducted on square and rectangular footings resting on or embedded in a dry sand and shaken in a shake box. The shake box was designed to subject the soil to simple shear conditions during shaking. Model footings, constructed from lead, were used to study the seismic bearing capacity. The influence of the magnitude and frequency of the horizontal accelerations, the static bearing capacity safety factor, the footing shape, the depth of embedment, and the relative density of the soil on the seismic bearing capacity were investigated. It is shown that the initial shear fluidization acceleration is the maximum acceleration sustainable by a shallow footing regardless of the static bearing capacity safety factor. Critical accelerations from limit equilibrium analyses do not compare favorably with the experimental results except when the change in angle of friction from cyclic densification was taken into account.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fourth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-26-2001

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2001 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 26th, 12:00 AM Mar 31st, 12:00 AM

An Experimental Study of Seismic Bearing Capacity of Shallow Footings

San Diego, California

In this paper, the results of an experimental investigation on the response of model shallow footings to horizontal accelerations are presented. The experiments were conducted on square and rectangular footings resting on or embedded in a dry sand and shaken in a shake box. The shake box was designed to subject the soil to simple shear conditions during shaking. Model footings, constructed from lead, were used to study the seismic bearing capacity. The influence of the magnitude and frequency of the horizontal accelerations, the static bearing capacity safety factor, the footing shape, the depth of embedment, and the relative density of the soil on the seismic bearing capacity were investigated. It is shown that the initial shear fluidization acceleration is the maximum acceleration sustainable by a shallow footing regardless of the static bearing capacity safety factor. Critical accelerations from limit equilibrium analyses do not compare favorably with the experimental results except when the change in angle of friction from cyclic densification was taken into account.