Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

Prior to the M 6.8 Northridge, California, earthquake, the two principal scenarios for Southern California were based on a recurrence of a great earthquake (M 8.25) on the San Andreas Fault system and a moderate earthquake (M 6.5) on the Newport-Inglewood fault zone. Like the January 17, 1994, Northridge earthquake, the new scenario event--a blind thrust fault beneath Los Angeles--is expected to generate very high levels of ground shaking (acceleration, velocity, displacement, spectral response) in the epicentral region, trigger ground failure over a wide area; cause extensive damage to the built environment; and test all aspects of the earthquake risk management systems in place in Southern California.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

A New Scenario Earthquake for Southern California Based on the January 17, 1994, Northridge Earthquake

St. Louis, Missouri

Prior to the M 6.8 Northridge, California, earthquake, the two principal scenarios for Southern California were based on a recurrence of a great earthquake (M 8.25) on the San Andreas Fault system and a moderate earthquake (M 6.5) on the Newport-Inglewood fault zone. Like the January 17, 1994, Northridge earthquake, the new scenario event--a blind thrust fault beneath Los Angeles--is expected to generate very high levels of ground shaking (acceleration, velocity, displacement, spectral response) in the epicentral region, trigger ground failure over a wide area; cause extensive damage to the built environment; and test all aspects of the earthquake risk management systems in place in Southern California.