Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

A simple model for predicting liquefaction induced displacement is presented. The method is based on a single-degree-of-freedom system that incorporates the post-liquefaction stress-strain response of sand. The key parameters are the residual strength and the limiting shear strain, and considerable data presently exists on these two parameters from correlation with SPT (N1)60 values. Based on this data, liquefaction induced displacements from the model are compared with both field and laboratory measurements. The model predictions are found to be in excellent agreement with the measurements and indicate that liquefaction induced displacements are very sensitive to the density or (N1)60 value. The large observed displacements appear to be associated with (N1)60 values less than 8. Much smaller displacement are predicted for denser sands with (N1)60 values in excess of 12.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

A Model for Predicting Liquefaction Induced Displacement

St. Louis, Missouri

A simple model for predicting liquefaction induced displacement is presented. The method is based on a single-degree-of-freedom system that incorporates the post-liquefaction stress-strain response of sand. The key parameters are the residual strength and the limiting shear strain, and considerable data presently exists on these two parameters from correlation with SPT (N1)60 values. Based on this data, liquefaction induced displacements from the model are compared with both field and laboratory measurements. The model predictions are found to be in excellent agreement with the measurements and indicate that liquefaction induced displacements are very sensitive to the density or (N1)60 value. The large observed displacements appear to be associated with (N1)60 values less than 8. Much smaller displacement are predicted for denser sands with (N1)60 values in excess of 12.