Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

The concept of energy to define liquefaction has been recognized by several authors. This approach has the advantage over other known methods to define liquefaction of considering a fundamental concept (energy), and of offering the potential of more closely considering random motion effects such as those introduced by earthquake loading. This paper presents the development of relationships between normalized pore pressure and unit energy required to induce liquefaction from testing hollow cylinder sand specimens prepared at different relative densities, and subjected to different confining pressures and shear strain amplitudes. Specimens were tested under constant maximum strain using a sinusoidal torsional shear device. These relationships are useful in determining the required amount of energy to induce liquefaction which coupled with a time series record of the design ground motion would allow the determination of the liquefaction potential of a soil deposit.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

An Energy Approach in Defining Soil Liquefaction

St. Louis, Missouri

The concept of energy to define liquefaction has been recognized by several authors. This approach has the advantage over other known methods to define liquefaction of considering a fundamental concept (energy), and of offering the potential of more closely considering random motion effects such as those introduced by earthquake loading. This paper presents the development of relationships between normalized pore pressure and unit energy required to induce liquefaction from testing hollow cylinder sand specimens prepared at different relative densities, and subjected to different confining pressures and shear strain amplitudes. Specimens were tested under constant maximum strain using a sinusoidal torsional shear device. These relationships are useful in determining the required amount of energy to induce liquefaction which coupled with a time series record of the design ground motion would allow the determination of the liquefaction potential of a soil deposit.