Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

The stress-dilatancy relations of sand for the stress paths involved in a complete periodic stress cycle are set up. The plastic potential functions for' each loading stage are derived consequently. Based on the idea of using a stress-strain relationship as an alternative strain-hardening law, the drained volume changes under different effective stress paths are derived and verified. A pore pressure generation mechanism which can take into account the dilatancy of soli directly and the related computational model are put forward. The model can calculate the instantaneous and residual pore pressures in sand and depict the liquefaction process of sand quantitatively, especially the dilatancy behavior.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

An Elastoplastic Model for Sand Liquefaction

St. Louis, Missouri

The stress-dilatancy relations of sand for the stress paths involved in a complete periodic stress cycle are set up. The plastic potential functions for' each loading stage are derived consequently. Based on the idea of using a stress-strain relationship as an alternative strain-hardening law, the drained volume changes under different effective stress paths are derived and verified. A pore pressure generation mechanism which can take into account the dilatancy of soli directly and the related computational model are put forward. The model can calculate the instantaneous and residual pore pressures in sand and depict the liquefaction process of sand quantitatively, especially the dilatancy behavior.