Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-26-1981

Session End Date

5-3-1981

Abstract

The interparticle arrangement, or fabric, of sands is a key determinant of sample rigidity. This rigidity, in large part, determines the velocity and attenuation of acoustic transmissions in a test specimen, as well as its resistance to liquefaction. Utilizing high frequency small-amplitude compressional wave transmissions, different fabric arrangements of standard triaxial samples of the same sand have been reliably identified from their acoustic response. Both the compressional wave velocity and attenuation were used to determine the acoustic signature of a sample. Cyclic triaxial testing of the same laboratory-prepared samples revealed that there is direct relationship between the acoustic response of a sample prepared by a particular method and its resistance to liquefaction. The effect of stress history, induced by pre-shaking, on the resistance to liquefaction of a test sample was also detected by changes in the acoustic signature.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-26-1981

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1981 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 26th, 12:00 AM May 3rd, 12:00 AM

Acoustic Identification of Liquefaction Potential

St. Louis, Missouri

The interparticle arrangement, or fabric, of sands is a key determinant of sample rigidity. This rigidity, in large part, determines the velocity and attenuation of acoustic transmissions in a test specimen, as well as its resistance to liquefaction. Utilizing high frequency small-amplitude compressional wave transmissions, different fabric arrangements of standard triaxial samples of the same sand have been reliably identified from their acoustic response. Both the compressional wave velocity and attenuation were used to determine the acoustic signature of a sample. Cyclic triaxial testing of the same laboratory-prepared samples revealed that there is direct relationship between the acoustic response of a sample prepared by a particular method and its resistance to liquefaction. The effect of stress history, induced by pre-shaking, on the resistance to liquefaction of a test sample was also detected by changes in the acoustic signature.