Location

Chicago, Illinois

Session Start Date

4-29-2013

Session End Date

5-4-2013

Abstract

The City of Pocatello, Idaho does not currently treat its storm water, but rather collects runoff in detention basins or discharges it into the Portneuf River. Nitrates from fertilizers and petroleum products enter local waterways and ultimately groundwater supplies. Porous concrete is regarded as a green product and has storm water filtering capabilities. Idaho State University (ISU) has been studying the use of scoria (vesicular basalt) to retain petroleum contaminants which migrate through porous concrete collection systems placed on driving surfaces. At present, ISU is conducting laboratory experiments using a physical model consisting of a porous concrete slab made with coarse scoria aggregate over a scoria base. The model is being used to determine the capacity of the scoria to retain water/petroleum fluids. Microbial bacteria, similar to those used to clean oil spills, are also being introduced and studied. A test section was poured in October 2011 in the topographically low area of damaged parking lot on the ISU campus. A scoria leach field was placed to discharge the collected water. Monitoring wells were placed below the slab and in the leach field to measure water levels. The slab was checked throughout the winter and will be monitored during the next year. To date the porous concrete has performed extremely well, and no additional pavement/curb damage has been observed in the vicinity. By employing scoria with porous concrete, precipitation runoffs from driving surfaces can be re-introduced to local aquifers with less pollution, preserving clean water for future generations.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Seventh Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

4-29-2013

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2013 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 29th, 12:00 AM May 4th, 12:00 AM

Use of Porous Concrete and Scoria Bases to Clean Groundwater Recharge

Chicago, Illinois

The City of Pocatello, Idaho does not currently treat its storm water, but rather collects runoff in detention basins or discharges it into the Portneuf River. Nitrates from fertilizers and petroleum products enter local waterways and ultimately groundwater supplies. Porous concrete is regarded as a green product and has storm water filtering capabilities. Idaho State University (ISU) has been studying the use of scoria (vesicular basalt) to retain petroleum contaminants which migrate through porous concrete collection systems placed on driving surfaces. At present, ISU is conducting laboratory experiments using a physical model consisting of a porous concrete slab made with coarse scoria aggregate over a scoria base. The model is being used to determine the capacity of the scoria to retain water/petroleum fluids. Microbial bacteria, similar to those used to clean oil spills, are also being introduced and studied. A test section was poured in October 2011 in the topographically low area of damaged parking lot on the ISU campus. A scoria leach field was placed to discharge the collected water. Monitoring wells were placed below the slab and in the leach field to measure water levels. The slab was checked throughout the winter and will be monitored during the next year. To date the porous concrete has performed extremely well, and no additional pavement/curb damage has been observed in the vicinity. By employing scoria with porous concrete, precipitation runoffs from driving surfaces can be re-introduced to local aquifers with less pollution, preserving clean water for future generations.