Location

Chicago, Illinois

Session Start Date

4-29-2013

Session End Date

5-4-2013

Abstract

Society requires increasingly that the hazard and risk associated with engineered constructions be quantified. The paper presents ge-otechnical hazard assessment in the context of a risk framework. Concepts of uncertainties, reliability, safety and risk are briefly re-viewed. The use of the approach is exemplified for offshore facilities, including a piled foundation, a gravity foundation, a jack-up structure and underwater slopes. The applications demonstrate that probabilistic analyses complement the conventional deterministic safety factor and deformation-based analyses, and contribute to achieving a safer and optimum design. The conclusions emphasize the usefulness of a risk assessment, the importance of engineering judgment in the assessment and the need for involving multi-disciplinary competences to achieve reliable estimates of hazard and risk. The profession can only gain by implementing more sys-tematically than before probabilistic-based thinking and risk-based approaches.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Seventh Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

4-29-2013

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2013 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 29th, 12:00 AM May 4th, 12:00 AM

Probabilistic Geotechnical Analyses For Offshore Facilities

Chicago, Illinois

Society requires increasingly that the hazard and risk associated with engineered constructions be quantified. The paper presents ge-otechnical hazard assessment in the context of a risk framework. Concepts of uncertainties, reliability, safety and risk are briefly re-viewed. The use of the approach is exemplified for offshore facilities, including a piled foundation, a gravity foundation, a jack-up structure and underwater slopes. The applications demonstrate that probabilistic analyses complement the conventional deterministic safety factor and deformation-based analyses, and contribute to achieving a safer and optimum design. The conclusions emphasize the usefulness of a risk assessment, the importance of engineering judgment in the assessment and the need for involving multi-disciplinary competences to achieve reliable estimates of hazard and risk. The profession can only gain by implementing more sys-tematically than before probabilistic-based thinking and risk-based approaches.