Location

Chicago, Illinois

Session Start Date

4-29-2013

Session End Date

5-4-2013

Abstract

It is argued that there is still a need for further exploratory research to unravel the ultimate causes of unresolved case histories (especially those involving failures) in geotechnical earthquake engineering. Three specific examples motivated from the records of the four major seismic episodes that shook the city of Christchurch, New Zealand, in 2010 and 2011 are presented in detail. Peculiarities in these records call for an investigation of a number of plausible seismological and geotechnical contributing factors including source mechanics, forward-rupture directivity, 1Dsoil amplification, soil liquefaction, 2D basin amplification, and topographic aggravation.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Seventh Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

4-29-2013

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2013 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 29th, 12:00 AM May 4th, 12:00 AM

Inconclusive Case Histories in Earthquake Geotechnics From Christchurch

Chicago, Illinois

It is argued that there is still a need for further exploratory research to unravel the ultimate causes of unresolved case histories (especially those involving failures) in geotechnical earthquake engineering. Three specific examples motivated from the records of the four major seismic episodes that shook the city of Christchurch, New Zealand, in 2010 and 2011 are presented in detail. Peculiarities in these records call for an investigation of a number of plausible seismological and geotechnical contributing factors including source mechanics, forward-rupture directivity, 1Dsoil amplification, soil liquefaction, 2D basin amplification, and topographic aggravation.