Location

Chicago, Illinois

Session Start Date

4-29-2013

Session End Date

5-4-2013

Abstract

Early in his engineering career, Ralph Peck supervised the soil mechanics investigations during subway construction in the soft clays in Chicago, working under the guidance of Karl Terzaghi. A major focus was to determine what should be done to minimize surface settlements of the streets. Squeeze tests, in which clay displacements and construction events in the tunnel were observed, led to changes that significantly reduced surface settlement. Squeeze test reports prepared by Peck and his soil mechanics team are summarized and selected drawings illustrated. The work provides a first view of Peck’s observational method: “it demonstrated the enormous practical benefits … that may be derived from simple but intelligently interpreted observations.” Over the past 70 years, it has served as a standard for investigation and control of ground movement, examples of which are summarized at the end of the paper.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Seventh Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

4-29-2013

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2013 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 29th, 12:00 AM May 4th, 12:00 AM

Tunneling in Chicago Clay: Pioneering Work in Ground Control

Chicago, Illinois

Early in his engineering career, Ralph Peck supervised the soil mechanics investigations during subway construction in the soft clays in Chicago, working under the guidance of Karl Terzaghi. A major focus was to determine what should be done to minimize surface settlements of the streets. Squeeze tests, in which clay displacements and construction events in the tunnel were observed, led to changes that significantly reduced surface settlement. Squeeze test reports prepared by Peck and his soil mechanics team are summarized and selected drawings illustrated. The work provides a first view of Peck’s observational method: “it demonstrated the enormous practical benefits … that may be derived from simple but intelligently interpreted observations.” Over the past 70 years, it has served as a standard for investigation and control of ground movement, examples of which are summarized at the end of the paper.