Location

Chicago, Illinois

Session Start Date

4-29-2013

Session End Date

5-4-2013

Abstract

Lee County widened Mississippi River Road north of the Keokuk, Iowa in the early 1990s, removing material from the toe of slopes along the alignment. Gabion walls were constructed to provide grade separation. Significant precipitation occurred in the spring of 2010, and two (2) wall sections (about 100 feet each in length) failed. Based on our site exploration and instrumentation monitoring data, the gabion wall sections appeared to fail due to additional lateral load from a soil mass sliding on top of the shale bedrock and a buildup of high ground water levels. To support the additional load of the soil mass, reestablish the gabion wall/slope, and to keep the road open to traffic, a tied back, closely-spaced drilled shaft wall was designed to remediate the slide and augment the original gabion wall. This paper describes the investigation, analyses and the design and construction of the remedial measures adopted.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Seventh Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

4-29-2013

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2013 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 29th, 12:00 AM May 4th, 12:00 AM

Mississippi River Road Gabion Wall/Slope Stabilization

Chicago, Illinois

Lee County widened Mississippi River Road north of the Keokuk, Iowa in the early 1990s, removing material from the toe of slopes along the alignment. Gabion walls were constructed to provide grade separation. Significant precipitation occurred in the spring of 2010, and two (2) wall sections (about 100 feet each in length) failed. Based on our site exploration and instrumentation monitoring data, the gabion wall sections appeared to fail due to additional lateral load from a soil mass sliding on top of the shale bedrock and a buildup of high ground water levels. To support the additional load of the soil mass, reestablish the gabion wall/slope, and to keep the road open to traffic, a tied back, closely-spaced drilled shaft wall was designed to remediate the slide and augment the original gabion wall. This paper describes the investigation, analyses and the design and construction of the remedial measures adopted.