Location

Chicago, Illinois

Session Start Date

4-29-2013

Session End Date

5-4-2013

Abstract

The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake with Mw7.9 induced numerous landslides along the Longmen Mt. zone in Sichuan Province of China. The authors investigated into various influential factors on the slope stability of 119 landslides in Wenchuan County, such as horizontal peak ground acceleration, slope angle, slope height, rock materials and geological structures. The authors developed hanging wall and footwall‟s acceleration attenuation formulae from 115 seismic stations and the formulae confirmed hanging-foot wall effect had notable influence on landslide distribution density and occurrence probability. The results of multivariable analysis clarified that slope height, horizontal peak ground acceleration and geological structures were more influential to sliding area and volume than slope angle and rock materials.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Seventh Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

4-29-2013

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2013 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 29th, 12:00 AM May 4th, 12:00 AM

Susceptibility Analysis on Landslide Triggering Factors During the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake

Chicago, Illinois

The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake with Mw7.9 induced numerous landslides along the Longmen Mt. zone in Sichuan Province of China. The authors investigated into various influential factors on the slope stability of 119 landslides in Wenchuan County, such as horizontal peak ground acceleration, slope angle, slope height, rock materials and geological structures. The authors developed hanging wall and footwall‟s acceleration attenuation formulae from 115 seismic stations and the formulae confirmed hanging-foot wall effect had notable influence on landslide distribution density and occurrence probability. The results of multivariable analysis clarified that slope height, horizontal peak ground acceleration and geological structures were more influential to sliding area and volume than slope angle and rock materials.